Harvard Study Finds Fluoride in Water May Lower IQ

Harvard Study Finds Fluoride Lowers IQ – Published in Federal Gov’t Journal

Published: Tuesday, Jul. 24, 2012 – 5:57 am

NEW YORK, July 24, 2012 – /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Harvard University researchers’ review of fluoride/brain studies concludes “our results support the possibility of adverse effects of fluoride exposures on children’s neurodevelopment.” It was published online July 20 inEnvironmental Health Perspectives, a US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences’ journal (1), reports the NYS Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation, Inc. (NYSCOF)

“The children in high fluoride areas had significantly lower IQ than those who lived in low fluoride areas,” write Choi et al.

Further, the EPA says fluoride is a chemical “with substantial evidence of developmental neurotoxicity.”

Fluoride (fluosilicic acid) is added to US water supplies at approximately 1 part per million attempting to reduce tooth decay.

Water was the only fluoride source in the studies reviewed and was based on high water fluoride levels. However, they point out research by Ding (2011) suggested that low water fluoride levels had significant negative associations with children’s intelligence.

Choi et al. write, “Although fluoride may cause neurotoxicity in animal models and acute fluoride poisoning causes neurotoxicity in adults, very little is known of its effects on children’s neurodevelopment. They recommend more brain/fluoride research on children and at individual-level doses.

“It’s senseless to keep subjecting our children to this ongoing fluoridation experiment to satisfy the political agenda of special-interest groups,” says attorney Paul Beeber, NYSCOF President.  “Even if fluoridation reduced cavities, is tooth health more important than brain health? It’s time to put politics aside and stop artificial fluoridation everywhere,” says Beeber.

After reviewing fluoride toxicological data, the NRC reported in 2006, “It’s apparent that fluorides have the ability to interfere with the functions of the brain.”

Choi’s team writes, “Fluoride readily crosses the placenta. Fluoride exposure to the developing brain, which is much more susceptible to injury caused by toxicants than is the mature brain, may possibly lead to damage of a permanent nature.”

Fluoride accumulates in the body. Even low doses are harmful to babies, the thyroid, kidney patients and heavy water-drinkers. There are even doubts about fluoridation’s effectiveness (2). New York City Legislation is pending to stop fluoridation. Many communities have already stopped.

Infant formula when mixed with fluoridated water delivers 100-200 times more fluoride than breastmilk.(3)

Read more here

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These drinking water systems filter water multiple times to ensure your good water is even better. Reverse osmosis systems differ from regular faucet-mounted systems because RO is a much more advanced method for providing pure, premium water to a dedicated faucet. Find out if sodium, ferrous iron or other organic contaminants are affecting your water’s quality with a free drinking water analysis from RainSoft.

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Increasing levels of nitrates in the water for some areas of California….

Do you have nitrates in your drinking water?

BY WATER QUALITY ASSOCIATION (WQA)
Drinking water contaminated with nitrates made national headlines recently when a University of California-Davis study predicted the presence of nitrates in drinking water will intensify in the years to come across California’s Salinas and Central valleys.

While the Davis’ study hones in on California’s nitrate problem, nitrates impact water quality across the United States.

What are nitrates?
Nitrates form when microorganisms break down fertilizers, decaying vegetation, manures and other organic materials. Principal sources of nitrate contamination include animal waste, fertilizers and septic tanks.

How are nitrates regulated?
Nitrates are regulated in the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974. The law authorizes the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine safe levels of potentially harmful chemicals in drinking water. These levels are called Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLG). The EPA sets the MCLG for nitrates at 10 parts per million (ppm).

Where are nitrates a problem?
Nitrate is a tasteless, colorless and odorless compound that homeowners cannot detect unless they have their water chemically analyzed. Municipalities are required to test water sources for nitrates annually and keep nitrates at safe levels. Homeowners with private wells should use a certified laboratory to test their water for nitrates and other contaminants on an annual basis.

Why is it important to regulate nitrate levels? 
Although nitrate is necessary for human and environmental health, high concentrations in drinking water can be harmful. Read more…

Hard Water, Calcium Build-up and High Energy Costs

Icky calcium build-up and high energy costs are just 2 of the many annoyances associated with hard water.

Save money and help the environment by checking on your water quality

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
(ARA) – Bruce Farrar didn’t like what hard water was doing to his home.

“Our dishes in the dishwasher were terrible,” says Farrar, who lives in Newport Beach, Calif. “The inside of the dishwasher was just covered with calcium. Also, our showers had glass doors and I had to put a special cleaner on them because of the calcium buildup.”

But the problems didn’t end there. Hard water was also preventing the family’s clothes washer from functioning properly, requiring the use of more soap and hotter water, which increased Farrar’s grocery bill and energy costs. The added energy needs were also putting more wear and tear on his hot water heater, decreasing its lifespan.

Nearly 90 percent of American homes have hard water – water containing high levels of calcium and magnesium, according to The U.S. Geological Survey. The hardest water is commonly found in the states that run from Kansas to Texas as well as in Southern California. How can you tell if you have hard water? If your shampoo and soap don’t lather up like they should, if you see scaling on your pipes and showerheads or if you have nasty brown rings in your sinks and toilets, your water is probably hard.

To know exactly how hard, and what to do about it, you should have your water diagnosed by a water quality professional.  Read more…

Loyola University eliminates the sale of bottled water on campus

Loyola University in Chicago is ridding its campus of bottled water.

School officials say bottled water will no longer be sold anywhere on campus starting in 2013.

A referendum was passed by students last week to phase out bottled water sales and reduce the university’s environmental footprint. Students launched a year-long campaign to eliminate bottled water sales and draw attention to water conservation.

Officials say the goal of the campaign was to address issues of local water privatization and fair access to water globally.

Read More…